Nanobots – Use Of Robotics In Medicine

Nanobots are robots that are microscopic in nature, measured largely on the scale of nanometers. They are currently in the research and development phase, but on realization they are expected to do specific tasks at the atomic, molecular and cellular level and help in bringing about many breakthroughs, especially in medical science.

Nanobots can be considered to be machine version of a bacteria or virus. They can be biological or synthetic, but are adapted to perform preprogrammed tasks at the atomic level. They are expected to be autonomous in nature and powered by a small cell or battery, or even solar cells. The whole idea behind nanobots is in having a device which can interact at the nano scale and help in understanding or manipulating structures at the nanoscale level.

Considering their potential, nanobots find their first and most prominent applications in medical science. Applications such as closing open wounds, rebuilding ruptured arteries and veins and traversing through the body for diagnoses are some important realizations. They are expected to aid in research related to cancer, AIDS and other major diseases as well as in helping brain, heart and diabetes research. Other applications where nanobots can potentially be of use are in aerospace, security, defense, electronics and environmental protection.

Potential uses for nanorobotics in medicine include early diagnosis and targeted drug-delivery for cancer, biomedical instrumentation,surgery,pharmacokinetics,monitoring of diabetes,and health care.In such plans, future medical nanotechnology is expected to employ nanorobots injected into the patient to perform work at a cellular level. Such nanorobots intended for use in medicine should be non-replicating, as replication would needlessly increase device complexity, reduce reliability, and interfere with the medical mission.

Nanotechnology provides a wide range of new technologies for developing customized means to optimize the delivery of pharmaceutical drugs. Today, harmful side effects of treatments such as chemotherapy are commonly a result of drug delivery methods that don’t pinpoint their intended target cells accurately.Researchers at Harvard and MIT, however, have been able to attach special RNA strands, measuring nearly 10 nm in diameter, to nanoparticles, filling them with a chemotherapy drug. These RNA strands are attracted to cancer cells. When the nanoparticle encounters a cancer cell, it adheres to it, and releases the drug into the cancer cell. This directed method of drug delivery has great potential for treating cancer patients while avoiding negative effects (commonly associated with improper drug delivery).

By – Assistant Professor – Mr. Akbar Nawaz
Department of Nursing
College Of Nursing UCBMSH
Uttaranchal (P.G.) College Of Bio-Medical Sciences & Hospital

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