Dementia

Dementia is an overall term for diseases and conditions characterized by a decline in memory, language, problem-solving and other thinking skills that affect a person’s ability to perform everyday activities.

Dementia is not a single disease; it’s an overall term — like heart disease — that covers a wide range of
specific medical conditions, including 
Alzheimer’s disease. Disorders grouped under the general term “dementia” are caused by abnormal brain changes. These changes trigger a decline in thinking skills, also known as cognitive abilities, severe enough to impair daily life and independent function. They also affect behaviour, feelings and relationships.

 

Memory loss and other symptoms of dementia

  • Symptoms of dementia can vary greatly. Examples include:
  • problems with short-term memory
  • keeping track of a purse or wallet
  • paying bills
  • planning and preparing meals
  • remembering appointments
  • Traveling out of the neighbourhood.

 

Causes

  • Dementia is caused by damage to brain cells. This damage interferes with the ability of brain cells to communicate with each other. When brain cells cannot communicate normally, thinking, behaviour and feelings can be affected.
  • The brain has many distinct regions, each of which is responsible for different functions (for example, memory, judgment and movement). When cells in a particular region are damaged, that region cannot carry out its functions normally

 

Diagnosis of dementia-There is no one test to determine if someone has dementia. Doctors diagnose Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia based on a careful medical history, a physical examination, laboratory tests, and the characteristic changes in thinking, day-to-day function and behaviour associated with each type. Doctors can determine that a person has dementia with a high level of certainty. But it’s harder to determine the exact type of dementia because the symptoms and brain changes of different dementias can overlap. In some cases, a doctor may diagnose “dementia” and not specify a type. If this occurs it may be necessary to see a specialist such as a neurologist or gero-psychologist.

Dementia treatment and care

  • Treatment of dementia depends on its cause. In the case of most progressive dementias, including Alzheimer’s disease, there is no cure and no treatment that slows or stops its progression. But there are drug treatments that may temporarily improve symptoms. The same medications used to treat Alzheimer’sare among the drugs sometimes prescribed to help with symptoms of other types of dementiasNon-drug therapies can also alleviate some symptoms of dementia.
  • Ultimately, the path to effective new treatments for dementia is through increased research funding and increased participation in clinical studies. Right now, volunteers are urgently needed to participate in clinical studies and trials about Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Dementia risk and prevention

New research shows there are things we can do to reduce the risk of mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

Some risk factors for dementia, such as age and genetics, cannot be changed. But researchers continue to explore the impact of other risk factors on brain health and prevention of dementia
adopting multiple healthy lifestyle choices, including healthy diet, not smoking, regular exercise and cognitive stimulation, may decrease
the risk of cognitive decline and dementia.

By – Nursing Tutor- : Aradhna George
Department – Dept. of Nursing
UCBMSH Magazine – (YouthRainBow)
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